Darrohn, Christine
Associate Professor of English
Degrees
1996 PhD Rutgers University; 1992 MA Rutgers University; 1988 MFA University of Arizona; 1985 BA Penn State University
Areas of Expertise
English: Composition, Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century British Literature, Postcolonial Literature, Women's Literature

Christine Darrohn has always been a devoted reader--as a little girl she refused to take her naps unless she could take a book to bed.  Today Christine is devoted to guiding her students to become strong readers of literature who can explore the meanings of the very smallest of textual details.  In her scholarship, Christine also examines texts closely in relation to a variety of cultural contexts, such as the Great War, early twentieth-century auditory technologies, and attitudes towards empire.  More fundamentally, she is interested in writers' representations of the possibilities and difficulties of forming human connections across social barriers.  Holding an MFA in creative writing in addition to a PhD in literature, Christine is a published fiction writer and is currently working on a novel.  Christine also coordinates the First-Year Seminar and Writing Seminar program, which facilitates students' academic transition to college. 


Kappeler, Erin
Visiting Assistant Professor of English
Degrees
2013 PhD English, Tufts University; 2007 MA English, Tufts University; 2005 BA English, Princeton University
Areas of Expertise
English: American Literature, Free Verse and Experimental Poetic Forms, Historical poetics, Modernism, Nineteenth-Century American Poetry, Twentieth-Century American Poetry

Erin Kappeler teaches courses in American literature, literary interpretation and analysis, and a first-year writing seminar on popular poetry. She specializes in modernist American poetry and prosody. Her research focuses on the history of American poetics, and she is currently working on a book-length project about the untold history of free verse in America between 1880 and 1920. She has articles forthcoming in Modernism/modernity and the edited volumes Critical Rhythm and the Wiley-Blackwell Companion to Modernist Poetry. When Professor Kappeler isn't in class or in her office, she can be found hiking, biking, or running somewhere nearby. 


Klein, Sabine
Associate Professor of English
Degrees
2000 MA English, University of Georgia at Athens; 2008 PhD American Studies, Purdue University
Areas of Expertise
English: American Studies Methodologies, Colonial New England, Colonial New Netherland, Comparative Colonial American Studies, Early Native American Studies, Transnational American Studies

Dr. Klein came to UMF after completing her doctoral work at Purdue University in 2008. Since then, she has taught multiple classes investigating the evolving relationships between settlers and Native Americans in the colonial era. However, her teaching interests are diverse, ranging from memory, history, and trauma in American literature to graphic novels to American intellectual history. She has published articles in Early American Literature and Early American Studies, and presented her work at multiple conferences and symposia. She is currently working on a book project that addresses the critical gap between transatlanticsm and Native American studies in Colonial America. 
Dr. Klein is also UMF's Director of Academic Program Assessment. In this role, she coordinates the efforts of academic programs to evaluate and improve student learning. 

In her free time, Dr. Klein enjoys exploring Maine's geography and history with her family.


Krueger, Misty
Visiting Assistant Professor of English
Degrees
2010 PhD University of Tennessee; 2003 MA Texas A & M University; 2001 BA University of Texas at San Antonio
Areas of Expertise
English: Early Modern Drama, Restoration and 18th-Century British Literature, Women's Literature

Professor Krueger teaches 18th-century literature, early British literature, Shakespeare, Romantic literature, literary interpretation and analysis, and first-year writing at UMF. She  specializes in Restoration and 18th-century English literature. Her research focuses on drama and gender studies, and she is currently working on a book-length project on revenge in Restoration and early 18th-century tragic drama. She has published articles on revenge, adaptaions of Shakespeare, and masculinity in Restoration drama. She is currently at work on essays about William Blake and Jane Austen. In her spare time she enjoys taking part in "readers' theatre" performances of 18th-century plays. 


Pu, Ming-Ming
Professor of English
Degrees
1982 BA Hefei Polytechnic University; 1984 MA Huazhong University of Science and Technology; 1991 PhD University of Alberta
Areas of Expertise
English: Linguistics

Ming-Ming Pu teaches courses in linguistics and first-year composition. She specializes in psycholinguistics. Her research interests lie mainly in exploring the fundamental relationship between language and cognition, especially how universal cognitive factors of memory and attention constrain the way we use language, and what general cognitive strategies we employ to facilitate language processing. She has been conducting empirical studies as well as comparative discourse analyses between Chinese and English, which have demonstrated that these two historically unrelated languages share common characteristics in discourse processing regardless of their morphosyntactic differences. In addition to her book Discourse Anaphora, she has published in linguistic journals such as Discourse Processes, Chinese Language Studies, Cognitive Linguistics, Canadian Journal of Linguistics and contributed chapters in numerous books.