May/Summer Term and Fall Semester Classes!

Students are now able to apply for May/Summer Term AND Fall Semester classes on ExplorEC. Below are our online offerings. And, as always, UMF will have classes available to Early College students on campus.

Course Number Course Section Title Course Dates Course Description
SUMMER 2022 ONLINE COURSES
41842 ACE-152 A001 Career & Major Engagement

8/7 – 26

Online Asynchronous 

Designed to aid students unclear of their major, this course utilizes experiential learning, class discussion, and reflective writing and projects to engage students in practical, real-world career and major engagement. Through this course, students will learn more about themselves by participating in a number of informative interviewing and career research activities to gain a better understanding of what majors they would like to explore and what career paths they may eventually decide to follow. By the end of the course, students will have participated and reflected upon a number of career experiences, participated in classroom discussion, and created a small portfolio displaying these experiences and growth. Prerequisite(s): None.
41843 ARH-284A A001 History of Japanese Film

8/1 – 26

Online Asynchronous

This course studies Japanese film within its social and cinematic context from the silent films of Ozu through the 1950s’ “golden age” of Ozu, Mizoguchi and Kurosawa, to the dystopic postmodernism of many directors today. This course provides an introduction to film theory. Writing-intensive. Prerequisites: none. 
41815 BUS-277 S001 Topics in Business

6/21 – 7/15

Online Asynchronous 

The course is designed with emphasis on business communication, which provides a realistic balance between communication theory and business practice. This course emphasizes business writing, nonverbal communication, cross-cultural communication, the small-group process and group dynamic, and the impact of ethics and technology on communication; working to prepare students to communicate effectively in a rapidly growing global workplace and business environment, nationally and internationally. Additionally, this course will help students learn the best practices in business communication, engage them in “real life” current issues and scenarios faced by professionals on the job, as well as to be able to think and write strategically for the effective communication of business goals by target audience. Continuing on, the course will work to bridge gender, ethnic, religious, and other differences that affect the workplace through communication initiatives that build trust and allegiance.
41823 COS-140 M001 Intro to Computer Science

5/9 – 6/17

Online Asynchronous

Using the framework of problem solving and programming in the object-oriented paradigm, this course introduces the fundamental concepts and techniques of Computer Science.  Students learn how to develop problem solutions by integrating pre-defined or user-defined data objects and the control algorithms that make use of the objects.  Topics include object design and use, algorithmic control structures, interactive and file-based input/output and some basic structured data objects such as strings, arrays, lists and tables.
41817 ENG-177 S001 Topics in English

6/21 – 7/22

Online Asynchronous

Poetry Reading & Writing is a course that familiarizes students with the basic craft, devices, and forms of poetry. Students will learn how to analyze and discuss poetry, write and workshop poems, and engage in revision during this introductory course.
41818 ENG-277H S002 Topics in English

5/9 – 8/26

Online Asynchronous

Town histories and family histories both make great material for creative nonfiction. We will explore these aspects of the past that are especially fascinating because they are meaningful to you. Personal interviews, genealogies, old newspapers and more can be used to create vivid stories that are part of your own personal history. The instructor is the author of three books of local history including Bar Harbor in the Roaring Twenties. This course can fulfill the ENG 212 nonfiction requirement for creative writing majors at UMF.
41828 ENV-110N M001 Intro Environmental Science

5/9 – 6/10

Online Asynchronous

Soils and the Environment; An introduction to the content, methods, and philosophy of science with an emphasis on the principles of environmental science and their application to topics in research or current issues in science. Each instructor will focus on a specific area of environmental science and use inquiry in the field and laboratory to allow more in-depth study of a particular sub-discipline or interdisciplinary topic. Topics of focus may include such areas as Lessons from the Wild, Understanding the Ecological Footprint, or Recognition of Gaia (students should check course listings for current offerings). Cannot be used as elective credit towards the Environmental Science track of the Earth and Environmental Sciences major. This course may be repeated for General Elective credit when the topic differs.
41829 ENV-110N M011 Intro Environmental Science

5/9 – 6/10

Online Asynchronous 

Soils and the Environment lab; must apply for lecture, too (class number 41828)
41819 ENV-110N S001 Intro Environmental Science

6/13 – 7/8

Online Asynchronous 

Wildlife Ecology and Conservation; An introduction to the content, methods, and philosophy of science with an emphasis on the principles of environmental science and their application to topics in research or current issues in science. Each instructor will focus on a specific area of environmental science and use inquiry in the field and laboratory to allow more in-depth study of a particular sub-discipline or interdisciplinary topic. Topics of focus may include such areas as Lessons from the Wild, Understanding the Ecological Footprint, or Recognition of Gaia (students should check course listings for current offerings). Cannot be used as elective credit towards the Environmental Science track of the Earth and Environmental Sciences major. This course may be repeated for General Elective credit when the topic differs. 
41820 ENV-110N S011 Intro Environmental Science

6/13 – 7/8

Online Asynchronous

Wildlife Ecology and Conservation lab; must apply for lecture, too (class number 41829)
41838 MAT-103M S001 Math Content Elem Sch Tch I

6/21 – 7/22

Online Asynchronous 

This is one of two courses designed to provide elementary education, special education, early childhood, and early childhood special education majors with the mathematical content they will need.  This course concentrates on ideas of numbers, sets and operations, looked at from a problem-solving perspective. Additional topics may come from geometry, statistics and probability. Prerequisite(s): Two years of high school algebra and high school geometry.
41771 MAT-104M M001 Math Content Elem Sch Tch II

5/9 – 6/10

Online Asynchronous

This is one of two courses designed to provide elementary education and K-3 early childhood education majors with the math content they will need. This course concentrates on geometry appropriate to the K-8 curriculum, but at a difficulty level appropriate to college students. The course also incorporates significant amounts of general problem-solving. MAT 103 is not a prerequisite for this course.
41822 MAT-120M M001 Introductory Statistics

5/9 – 6/10

Online Asynchronous

A general introductory course including descriptive statistics, basic probability, normal distributions, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing for means and proportions, two-sample t-tests for means, Chi-Squared tests, regression and correlation. Prerequisite(s): Two years of high school algebra.
41839 MAT-120M S002 Introductory Statistics

6/21 – 8/15

Online Asynchronous

A general introductory course including descriptive statistics, basic probability, normal distributions, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing for means and proportions, two-sample t-tests for means, Chi-Squared tests, regression and correlation. Prerequisite(s): Two years of high school algebra.
41837 MAT-141M M001 Calculus I

5/9 – 7/14

Online Asynchronous

Introduction to the basic concepts of limit, differentiation, and integration; study of their applications to problems in rates of change, extrema, and area between curves. Includes both rational and transcendental functions. Every semester.
41769 PHI-100H M001 Critical Thinking

5/9 – 7/22

Online Asynchronous

The “fake news” problem is not an entirely new issue: It has always been difficult to figure out what it is reasonable to believe. Fortunately, there’s Critical Thinking. This course will look to logical techniques for distinguishing reasonable arguments from fallacious ones, and to increased media literacy to help distinguish more likely beliefs from less likely ones. It is an extremely practical course applicable to all areas of inquiry and human life.
41821 POS-204S S001 American Foreign Policy

6/21 – 7/22

Online Asynchronous

This course analyzes American Foreign policy by considering history, political and institutional processes, and the current dilemmas faced by policy makers. Emphasis is placed on difficult practical and ethical issues that face Americans in a time of globalization and change.
41601 POS-277S M001 Topics in Political Science: The Global Politics of Climate Change

5/9 – 8/26

Online Asynchronous

Topic: The Global Politics of Climate

Climate Change is seen by scientists as an existential threat to human kind, putting our way of lives at risk at the very least. Yet although the first Climate Change agreement was in 1992, and many other efforts have taken place since, greenhouse gas emissions continue to grow with scientists increasingly alarmed. This course explores the global politics of climate change as a problem to be addressed. The question driving the course is: How serious is the problem of climate change, what has been done, and what more can or should be done? Implicit is also the question of why so little progress has been made. Although there will be readings about the history and science behind the issue, as well as the nature of international cooperation, much of the work will be done by students investigating an aspect of the issue, and reporting, sharing with each other. Those issues will be chosen with guidance from the instructor to assure that we have coverage that can help the class put together a kind of class report on what needs to be done moving forward.

41866 PSY-106 M001 Self-Determine: Theory & Pract

5/9 – 6/10

Online Asynchronous

This course will use theory of motivation to understand academic development and success.  Self-determination theory suggests that if the basic psychological needs of autonomy, competence, and relatedness are met then intrinsic motivation will flourish.  Students will apply an understanding of these basic psychological needs to their own motivation, especially as it relates to academic success.  Topics will include mindset, goal-setting, self-regulation, and work habits. Prerequisite(s): None.
PSY-111 M001 Adolescent Psychology

5/9 – 6/10

Online Asynchronous 

In this course students will analyze the biological, psychological, and social changes that take place during the period of adolescence. Topics will include: neurobiology of the adolescent brain, identity, social and emotional development, and the transition to adulthood. Through reading, reflection, and interactive online tools, students will examine contemporary youth culture from a developmental perspective Prerequisites: None.
41824 PSY-177 M001 Special Topics: Psychology in Everyday Life

5/9 – 8/26

Online Asynchronous 

Topic: Psychology in Everyday Life

This course will review applications of clinical psychology and principles of behavior change in everyday life. Students will learn to recognize commonalities between daily stressors or tasks and clinical psychology (e.g., procrastination vs anxiety). Students will consider how to apply core principles of clinical psychology interventions to practical daily tasks (e.g., getting started on that big project; interpersonal communication).

41840 REH-112 S001 Lunatics, Lock-ups, & Lobotomies 

6/21 – 7/22

Online Asynchronous

The history of treatment of people with mental illness is filled with fascinating stories. This course will explore institutions of the late 1800s through the mid 1900s and the historical events and societal attitudes that impacted treatment of people who were diagnosed with mental illness at that time. Students will examine patterns that existed historically, and explore the degree to which such attitudes continue in the present day.  No prerequisites
41832 TEC-101 M001 Introduction to Excel VBA

5/9 – 6/10

Online Asynchronous 

This course will help students obtain practical fluency in Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) specifically as it applies to Microsoft Excel.  This is an introductory programming course.  No previous programming experience is assumed, though basic experience with Excel is expected.  This one-credit course is offered in an asynchronous, online format.
41833 TEC-102 M001 Introduction to SQL

5/9 – 6/17

Online Asynchronous 

This course will help students obtain practical fluency in SQL (Structured Query Language) used to create, manipulate and retrieve data from relational database management systems. This is an introductory course. No previous programming or database experience is assumed. This  course is offered in an asynchronous, online format.
41834 TEC-103 M001 Introduction to Python

5/9 – 6/17

Online Asynchronous

This course will introduce students to the Python programming language. Syntactical building blocks covering data storage, data manipulation, control structures, input/output and abstractions will be covered. No previous programming or database experience is assumed. This two-credit course is offered in an asynchronous, online format.
41835 TEC-104 M001 Introduction to R

5/9 – 6/17

Online Asynchronous

This course will introduce students to the R programming language. Syntactical building blocks covering data storage, data manipulation, control structures, input/output and abstractions will be covered. No previous programming or database experience is assumed. This two-credit course is offered in an asynchronous, online format.
41836 TEC-105 M001 Data Visualization with Tableau

5/9 – 6/17

Online Asynchronous

This course will introduce students to the Tableau data visualization tool. Topics will include connecting to different types of data, data cleaning and preparation, types of visualizations, and adding interactivity.
41841 TEC-106 S001 Intermediate Excel for Business

6/21 – 7/22

Online Asynchronous

This course aims to tackle the most common and practical uses of Excel in business. It is designed for students who have a basic working knowledge of Excel and would like to improve efficiency and expand into Excel’s more complex functions and data management features.
FALL 2022 ONLINE COURSES
63226 ANT-277S 0001 Special Topics in Anthropology – The Anthropology of the Borderland

MW 1:20 – 3:00

Online Synchronous 

8/29 – 12/9

This course offers study in a specialized topic in anthropology that is not offered in the usual anthropology curriculum, at an introductory level.  These topics include but are not limited to the Anthropology of Gender, Anthropology of Native North America, or Cultures in Conflict. Prerequisite(s): None.
62751 ENG-100 0002 Writing Seminar – Choose Your Own Adventure

TuTh 3:50 – 5:30

Online Synchronous

8/29 – 12/9

Choose Your Own Adventure: Writing assignments and discussion will revolve around the book your class decides to choose. Class members will suggest possibilities, survey their options and then vote on the choice they think will make a good read. The adventure we take will be up to you.
63266 GEO-103S 0001 Peoples and Environments

TuTh 9:50 – 11:30

Online Synchronous

8/29 – 12/9

Study of the human activities that occur in places. Emphasis on the spatial organization of cultural, economic, political, and demographic processes of the human landscape.
63271 GEO-214S 0001 Asia: Peoples and Environments

TuTh 3:50 – 5:30

Online Synchronous

8/29 – 12/9

This course introduces students to the human activities, environments, and characteristics of place in Asia. Students will learn how Asian landscapes and livelihoods have been constructed and are continually re-interpreted, through the study of culture spheres, landforms and climates, ecosystems, indigenous groups, colonial histories, population patterns, religious practices, economic and political systems, and tourism; some of these themes will be addressed through film or literature. Attention will also be given to the important ways in which Asian peoples and livelihoods connect with the United States and Maine.
631115 HEA-212 0001 Stress Management

TuTh 1:50 – 3:30

Online Synchronous

10/20 – 12/8

Variety of stress management techniques presented and opportunities for life-style examination and group support provided. Late start, 2 credit course
62946 REH-277 0001 Topics in Rehabilitation: Community Organizing 101

W 8:15 – 11:35

Online Synchronous

8/29 – 12/9

This course will explore current needs in the community that aren’t being addressed and ways students can be part of the solution instead of the problem. This course will allow UMF students to build community organizing skills and develop real-world solutions around a global issue of interest in collaboration with students from another country

Synchronous Zoom

62871 MAT-104M 0001 Mathematical Content for Elementary School Teachers II

M – 1:10-2:15 

Online Synchronous 

W – 1:10-2:15

 On Campus OR Online Asynchronous 

F – 

Online Asynchronous 

This is one of two courses designed to provide elementary education and K-3 early childhood education majors with the math content they will need. This course concentrates on geometry appropriate to the K-8 curriculum, but at a difficulty level appropriate to college students. The course also incorporates significant amounts of general problem-solving. MAT 103 is not a prerequisite for this course.
63011 PHI-277H 0001 Topics in Philosophy: Philosophy and the Law

Th 6:15 – 9:35 

Hybrid/Online Synchronous

Philosophy and the Law. Do hard cases make bad law? We will study the most significant judicial decisions on Native American rights, slavery, parental rights, surrogate motherhood, race, same sex marriage, rescue, privacy, executive privilege, capital punishment, abortion, insanity, gender, immigration, and mercy killing, to learn about the nature, content, and scope of the law, law”s relation to morality, and the philosophical issues and challenges associated with the domination of law and the legal system over an ever-evolving society of individuals who deem themselves to be free. Case method will be employed throughout the course. Cross listed with POS 277/0001 (XXXXXX) Prerequisite(s): None
63233 POS-277 0001 Topics in Political Science: Philosophy and the Law

Th 6:15 – 9:35

Hybrid/Online Synchronous

Philosophy and the Law. Do hard cases make bad law? We will study the most significant judicial decisions on Native American rights, slavery, parental rights, surrogate motherhood, race, same sex marriage, rescue, privacy, executive privilege, capital punishment, abortion, insanity, gender, immigration, and mercy killing, to learn about the nature, content, and scope of the law, law”s relation to morality, and the philosophical issues and challenges associated with the domination of law and the legal system over an ever-evolving society of individuals who deem themselves to be free. Case method will be employed throughout the course. Cross listed with POS 277/0001 (XXXXXX) Prerequisite(s): None
63268 EPP-131S 0001 Conservation and Environment

MWF 10:30 – 11:35

Hyflex

8/29 – 12/9

This class examines the ideas, institutions and regulatory frameworks for protecting environments, as well as the underlying theories of natural systems that inform environmental policy. We use the tools of social science to examine contemporary conservation and environmental controversies in depth, paying close attention to issues such as environmental justice, the role of civil society organizations and citizen participation, alternatives to regulation, and the relationship between consumption and environmental degradation. Cross-listed with GEO 131S. Students may receive credit for only one the the courses. 
63273 EPP-244S 0001 Mobile Mapping and GIS

TuTh 6:15 – 7:55

Hyflex

8/29 – 12/9

Web mapping, GPS-based navigation apps, and location-based services on our phones have quickly brought digital mapping technologies into our everyday lives. These technologies allow our online and real-world behaviors to be tracked and analyzed in new ways but they also give us access to powerful mobile mapping tools. In this class we will investigate how mobile mapping technologies are used to address a variety of societal problems, such as the response to natural disasters, tracking the spread of deadly diseases, and understanding climate change impacts. We will learn how to use mobile and web-based geographic information systems (GIS) to gather our own data and use that data to solve real-world problems. Cross-listed with GEO 244S. Students may receive credit for only one of the courses.
63231 POS-136S 0001 World Politics

TuTh 12:00 – 1:40

Hyflex

8/29 – 12/9

This course introduces students to issues affecting global politics. These include war, economic interdependence, global poverty, terrorism, and the nature of the modern state system. Special emphasis is placed on exploring the impact of world politics on the lives of people around the globe.
63232 POS-252S 0001 Modern Political Theory

Th 6:15 – 9:35

Hyflex

8/29 – 12/9

This course is designed to introduce students to political theory that underpins the contemporary study of politics in Western societies. Students will analyze a variety of writings beginning with Western philosophers in the late 18th century up through current debates among political theorists and activists from around the world. The course will concentrate on alternative concepts of and debates regarding the tension between equality and liberty.
62864 MAT-141M 0001 Calculus I

MWF 2:25 – 3:30

Online 

Synchronous with an Asynchronous Option

8/29 – 12/9

Introduction to the basic concepts of limit, differentiation, and integration; study of their applications to problems in rates of change, extrema, and area between curves. Includes both rational and transcendental functions
62938 REH-110 0001 Introduction to Disability Services

Online Asynchronous 

8/29 – 12/9

This course explores personal and societal conceptualizations of disability and chronic illness, including the medical model, rehabilitation model, minority group model, independent living model, and civil rights perspectives. The lived experience of disability will be explored and compared to long-held misconceptions and stigma associated with disability. History and legislation impacting the lives of people with disabilities will also be discussed. This course will provide an introduction to the role of recreation in the rehabilitation process and the therapeutic values of specific recreational activities for persons with disabilities.
62942 REH-120 0001 Introduction to Social Services

Online Asynchronous

8/29 – 12/9

This is an introductory course to the wide range of rehabilitation and social services professions, services and populations.  The focus of the course is on the foundation and philosophy of rehabilitation and the social services.  Students study professions (e.g. counseling and social work); services (e.g. child protection, probation/parole, community support), and populations (e.g. as juveniles, elderly, persons with mental illness and persons with addiction). The course includes a field experience component.

Contact Us

Kirsten Petroska
Director of Early College Partnerships
Division of Graduate & Continuing Education
University of Maine at Farmington
Theo Kalikow Education Center
186 High Street
Farmington, Maine 04938
tel 207-778-7266
TYY (via Maine Relay Service) dial 711
kirsten.petroska@maine.edu

Mailing address:
Division of Graduate & Continuing Education
University of Maine at Farmington
111 South Street
Farmington, Maine 04938